Skip to main content

Full text of "Institutions of higher learning in North Carolina"

See other formats








MHM> 



x-«s4;+o+ioYis of Hi^Kav 



1- 



£dLY*n *' 



-ng t-n N«C- 



r 




Library 

• r THE 

University of North. Carolina 
This book was presented by 



Q>3lS.9-fl4^r 



Educational Publication No. 58 Division of Teacheb Training Xo. 10 



INSTITUTIONS 



OF 



HIGHER LEARNING 



IN 



NORTH CAROLINA 










Published by the 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Raleigh, N. C. 



North Carolina State Department of 
Public Instruction 



DIVISION OF TEACHER TRAINING 

A. T. Allen Director 

Miss Hattie Parrot Supervisor- 
Miss Susan Fttlghum Supervisor 

Mrs. T. E. Johnston Supervisor 

Mks. B. R. Roberts Stenographer 



Contents 



PAGE 

1. Introduction 5 

2. College Conference and Standardization 9 

(a) Principles for Accrediting Colleges 12 

(b) Principles for Accrediting Junior Colleges 14 

3. Spirit of Cooperation 15 

4. Classification of Institutions 16 

5. Entrance Requirements 17 

Table I (a) Institutions for White People 20 

(b) Institutions for Colored People 21 

6. Graduation Requirements 22 

Table II (a) Institutions for White People 24 

(b) Institutions for Colored People 25 

7. The Faculty 26 

Table III (a) Institutions for White People 27 

(b) Institutions for Colored People 27 

8. Student Body 28 

Table IV (a) Institutions for White People 29 

(b) Institutions for Colored People 31 

9. Financial 32 

Table V (a) Institutions for White People 33 

(b) Institutions for Colored People , ....... 35 

10. Equipment 36 

Table VI (a) Institutions for White People ". 37 

(b) Institutions for Colored People 39 

11. List of Institutions in North Carolina 40 



[31 



INTRODUCTION 

The law governing the certification of teachers has made it necessary 
for the State Department of Education to secure a clearer knowledge 
of the extent and possibilities of higher education in North Carolina. 
What is a year of standard college work? What is a standard four- 
year college? The answer to these two questions was not available 
when the certification law was passed. It was not possible then to 
tell how many institutions were capable of giving one, two, three or 
four years of full college work because no standard had been set up 
by the State by which to judge the ability of an institution to do 
first class college work. 

The higher institutions of the State, therefore, were requested to 
aid the State Department of Education in erecting some standard by 
which they would be willing to be judged and at once they gave their 
assistance and unanimously adopted certain standards embraced in 
this bulletin, thus making it comparatively easy for the State Depart- 
ment of Education to measure the value of the certificates issued on 
the basis of college credits. ISTo more patriotic service has been ren- 
dered and no more helpful assistance has been given the State Depart- 
ment of Education by any group of educational workers than that 
contributed by the higher institutions of the State. It has been especial- 
ly noticeable that harmony and cooperation prevails among them and 
that they are a unit in their efforts to promote the educational prog- 
ress of North Carolina. Such valuable service rendered by the higher 
institutions in the State has contributed much to the growth and ex- 
pansion of our educational system. 

This bulletin on higher education was prepared by Mr. A. T. 
Allen, Director of Teacher Training, and is the result of several 
conferences with the representatives of all institutions doing work 
of college grade. The statistics are compiled from catalogs and re- 
ports submitted by them. This is the first comprehensive study of higher 
education in North Carolina and it is published in order to give the 
public a clearer understanding of the extent and possibilities of higher 
education in the State. 




State Superintendent Public Instruction. 



PREFACE 

This bulletin is merely a preliminary report on the status of higher 
education in North Carolina. In no way could it be understood 
to be a critical analysis of the situation. It will show in a very 
general way only the educational resources and effort of these institu- 
tions as of the school year 1920-21. 

The combined ability of these institutions to care for the needs of 
higher education in North Carolina is perhaps greater than the 
casual reader would suspect. The combined capital invested in build- 
ings, grounds and equipment reaches a total of $15,418,834. The 
invested funds represent an outlay of $5,528,240.13. This makes the 
total financial resources of these institutions $20,947,074.13. In the 
year 1920-21 the current expenditures amounted to $3,375,285.26. In 
the same year 686 professors and instructors were employed and 
7,778 students of college grade were in attendance. 

Heretofore no statistics relative to college education in North Caro- 
lina have been available. This bulletin attempts to present only 
the salient facts. Questionnaires were sent to all the institutions in 
August, 1921. Replies were received from the institutions listed in 
the tables. The catalogues for the school year 1920-21 were studied 
in connection with the information blanks. In addition to this, personal 
visits were made to about half of the institutions ' 

While this information was being collected, the North Carolina Col- 
lege Conference was organized. A short account of the work of this 
Conference is given in the first part of this bulletin. The "Principles 
for Accrediting Colleges," and the "Principles for Accrediting Junior 
Colleges" as adopted by this Conference will be found. 

In accordance with the adopted standards the institutions have been 
classified. The list will be found on page 16. This classification 
is not final. It is understood that this study will continue. From 
time to time the institutions will be reclassified. As their equipment 
is increased, their faculties strengthened, and their student bodies are 
enlarged, higher ratings will be given. 

[7] 



8 Preface 

The last part of the bulletin is given over to statistics. These have 
been used as a partial basis of the classification of the institutions. 
These tables are arranged so that the facts are presented in the order 
called for in the Principles for Rating Colleges adopted by the ISTorth 
Carolina College Conference. 

The purpose of all this work is to facilitate the transfer of credits 
from one institution to another without loss. It undertakes also 10 
bring the State Department of Education and the various institutions 
of the State into approximate harmony in the amount of college 
credit awarded for work in any given institution. 

Director of Teacher Training. 
September 20, 1922. 



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING 
IN NORTH CAROLINA 



THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE CONFERENCE ADOPTS PRINCIPLES 
FOR ACCREDITING COLLEGES 

The new certification scheme in North Carolina contemplates the gradation 
of teachers' certificates on the basis of standard college credits. Each 
class of certificate is separated from the next higher or lower class by 
one year of college work. As quickly as this scheme was published it be- 
came necessary for the State Department of Education to define very dis- 
criminatingly what was meant by a year of college work. 

An examination into the work of the agencies for the standardization of 
college credits revealed the fact that these agencies confined their efforts 
to two college types — the standard four-year college and the Junior College. 
The certification scheme demanded a closer and more discriminating defini- 
tion than this, as it offers credit on four levels; viz., one year, two years, 
three years and four years of college work. It became necessary there- 
fore not only to define these units in general terms, but also to specify 
the credit to be allowed in every institution of higher learning in the State. 

The amount of college credit allowed the students from the smaller institu- 
tions by the A Colleges in the State did not correspond with the amount 
of credit allowed on a teacher's certificate by the State Department of Educa- 
tion. In some instances the State allowed more credit than an A College 
would allow. Sometimes an A College would allow more credit than the 
State. Furthermore, the standard colleges themselves did not agree on the 
amount of credit to be allowed the graduates of the smaller institutions. 
All of these facts had a strong tendency to bring great confusion into the 
whole matter of college credits. 

In the midst of this confusion the State Department sent a representa- 
tive to Washington to confer with Dr. George F. Zook, Specialist in 
Higher Education in the Bureau of Education. Dr. Zook advised, that in 
his opinion, the colleges of the State should be called into conference to 
consider the whole question of standardization. 

While the State Superintendent of Public Instruction was contemplating 
asking the college executives to meet in such a conference, he ascertained 
that Dr. Raymond Binford, President of Guilford College, acting upon the 
advice of a number of other college presidents, was about to call a meet- 
ing of the heads of all the higher institutions for the consideration of a 
number of questions of vital interest to all the colleges. The State Depart- 
ment of Education was very cordially invited to participate in this con- 

[9] 



10 Institutions of Higher Learning 

ference. The program of one entire evening was set aside for the con- 
sideration of college standards. 

The first meeting of this conference was held in the O. Henry Hotel, 
Greensboro, on October 7, 1921. Dr. Raymond Binford was elected Presi- 
dent, and Professor N. W. Walker was elected Secretary. Dr. Zook presented 
the matter of college standards, and told what was being done by the 
various agencies working in the field. The conference decided unanimously 
to take up the matter at once in a serious way and to work out a scheme 
whereby all parties by agreement would place approximately the same value 
in terms of college credits on the work at the various institutions of the 
State. The conference appointed a committee to draft tentative standards 
for colleges and to present them to a later meeting of the conference for 
consideration. This committee was composed of the following gentlemen: 

Dr. W. P. Few, Trinity College. 

Dr. L. E. Cook, N. C. State College of A. and E. 

Dr. C. G. Vardell, Flora Macdonald College. 

Dr. C. E. Brewer, Meredith College. 

Dr. E. W. Knight, University of North Carolina. 

This committee met in the 0. Henry Hotel early in November to 
prepare the tentative standards. Dr. George F. Zook was present at this 
meeting. He had just returned from a session of the Joint Committee 
on Standards from the American Council on Education and the National 
Conference Committee on Standards of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
This committee had formulated a set of statements which it designated 
as "Principles for Accrediting Colleges." 

The committee of the North Carolina College Conference adopted these 
principles as the basis of its report. With only a few minor changes, to 
adapt them to conditions in North Carolina, the committee decided to present 
them to the whole conference for consideration. Before the principles 
could be presented to the conference, the Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools in the Southern States held a meeting in Birmingham and 
adopted a new set of standards for rating colleges. These new standards 
were undoubtedly based on the principles promulgated by the National 
Committee. 

The second meeting of the North Carolina College Conference was held 
in the 0. Henry Hotel on March 10, 1922. The following institutions 
participated in the Conference: 

Atlantic Christian College: 
President H. S. Hilley. 

Catawba College: 

President A. D. Wolfinger. 

Davidson College: 

Professor F'razer Hood. 

East Carolina Teachers' College: 
President Robert H. Wright. 

Elon College: 

Professor W. C. Wicker. 



In North Carolina 11 

Flora Macdonald College: 
President C. G. Vardell. 

Greensboro College for Women: 
President S. B. Turrentine. 
Professor D. F. Nicholson. 

Guilford College: 

President Raymond Binford. 
Professor L. Lea White. 

Lenoir College: 

President J. C. Peery. 
Professor R. L. Fritz. 

Meredith College: 

President Charles E. Brewer. 

North Carolina College for Women: 
President J. I. Foust. 
Dean W. C. Smith. 

N. C. State College of A. and E.: 
Professor L. E. Cook. 

Oxford College: 

President F. P. Hobgood. 

Peace Institute: 

President Mary O. Graham. 

Miss May McLelland. 
Queens College: 

President W. H. Frazer. 
Rutherford College: 

Professor W. E. Hauss. 
Salem Academy and College: 

President Howard E. Rondthaler. 
State Department of Education: 

State Superintendent E. C. Brooks. 

High School Inspector J. Henry Highsmith. 

Director of Teacher Training A. T. Allen. 
Trinity College: 

President W. P. Few. 
University of North Carolina: 

President H. W. Chase. 

Professor N. W. Walker. 
Honorary Member: 

Dr. R. T. Vann. 

At this meeting, the Principles for Accrediting Colleges were presented 
to the whole conference. Every section was throughly discussed. Practically 
every member of the conference participated in some phase or other of the 
discussion. Each principle was voted on separately and adopted by unani- 
mous vote. The State Department of Education was designated as the agency 
through which these principles should be applied. 



12 Institutions of Higher Learning 

PRINCIPLES FOR ACCREDITING COLLEGES 

[Approved and Adopted by the N. C. College Conference — Starch 10, 1922.] 

The principles as adopted are as follows: 

The term "college as used below is understood to designate all institu- 
tions of higher education which grant non-professional bachelor's degrees. 
The committee recommends that the following principles and standards be 
observed in accrediting colleges: 

1. The requirement for admission shall be the satisfactory completion of 
a four-year course in a secondary school approved by a recognized accreditng 
agency, or the equivalent of such a course as shown by examination. The 
major portion of the secondary school course accepted for admission should 
be definitely correlated with the curriculum to which the student is ad- 
mitted. 

2. A college should demand for graduation the completion of a minimum 
quantitative requirement of 120 semester hours of credit (or the equivalent 
in term hours, quarter hours, points, majors, or courses), with further 
scholastic qualitative requirements adapted by each institution to its con- 
ditions. 

Note 1- Two semesters should constitute a college year of not less 
than thirty-four weeks exclusive of holidays. 

Note 2: The recitation hour should be sixty minutes gross, or not less 
than fifty minutes of actual teaching. 

3. The size of the faculty should bear a definite relation to the type of 
institution, the number of students, and the number of courses offered. For 
a college of approximately 100 students in a single curriculum the faculty 
should consist of at least eight heads of departments devoting full time to 
college work. With the growth of the student body, the number of full- 
time teachers should be correspondingly increased. The development of 
varied curricula should involve the addition of further heads of departments. 

The training of the members of the faculty of professorial rank should 
include at least two years of study in their respective fields of teaching in 
recognized graduate schools, or a corresponding professional or technical 
training. It is desirable that the training of the head of a department 
should be equivalent to that required for a Doctor's Degree, or should 
represent a corresponding professional or technical training. A college 
should be judged in large part by the ratio which the number of persons 
of professorial rank with sound training, scholarly achievement and suc- 
cessful experience as teachers bears to the total number of the teaching 
staff. 

Teaching schedules exceeding 16 hours per week per instructor, or classes 
(exclusive of lectures) of more than thirty students should be interpreted as 
endangering educational efficiency. 

Note 1 •■ One year of training above the Bachelor's Degree will be accepted 
until 1923. 

Note 2: Instructors having entire charge of a course should show one year 
of training in his particular field above the Bachelor's Degree. 



Ix North Carolina 13 

4. The minimum annual operating income for an accredited college should 
be $50,000, of which not less than $25,000 should be derived from stable 
sources, other than students, preferably from permanent endowments. In- 
crease in faculty, student body, and scope of instruction should be judged 
in relation to its educational program. 

Note 1 ■■ Until 1924 $40,000 income and $15,000 from stable sources will be 
accepted. 

5. The material equipment and upkeep of a college, its buildings, lands, 
laboratories, apparatus, and libraries should also be judged by their efficiency 
in relation to its educational program. 

A college should have a live well distributed professionally administered 
library of at least 8,000 volumes, exclusive of public documents, bearing 
specifically upon the subjects taught, and with a definite annual appropria- 
tion for the purchase of new books. 

Note i-- 6,000 volumes until 1924 will be accepted. 

6. A college should not maintain a preparatory school as part of its college 
organization. If such a school is maintained under the college charter it 
should be kept rigidly distinct and separate from the college in students, 
faculty and buildings. 

Note 1- Omit the phrase "and buildings" until 1924. 

7. In determining the standing of a college emphasis should be placed 
upon the character of the curriculum, the efficiency of instruction, the stand- 
ard for regular degrees, the conservatism in granting honorary degrees, 
the tone of the institution and its success in stimulating and preparing stu- 
dents to do satisfactory work in recognized graduate, professional, or re- 
search institutions. 

8. No college should be accredited until it has been inspected and reported 
upon by an agent, or agents regularly appointed by the accrediting organiza- 
tion. 



THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE CONFERENCE ADOPTS PRINCIPLES 
FOR ACCREDITING JUNIOR COLLEGES 

At the Greensboro meeting of the College Conference, the Committee on 
Standards was continued and directed to formulate principles for accredit- 
ing Junior Colleges and to present them for consideration at a called meet- 
ing of the Conference. 

President W. P. Few convened this Committee in the Yarborough Hotel on 
July 22, 1922. The following members of the committee were present: 

Dr. W. P. Few, Chairman. 
Dr. Charles E. Brewer. 
Dr. E. W. Knight 
Dr. L. E. Cook. 

Dr. C. G. Vardell was in Scotland at the time of the meeting, and could 
not attend. Dr. E. D. Fusey, Secretary of the Association of Colleges and 



14 Institutions of Higher Learning 

Secondary Schools of the Southern States, was present by request of the 
Chairman. Mr. J. Henry Highsmith and A. T. Allen of the Slate Depart- 
ment of Education were present as visitors. 

The committee had for its consideration the tentative report of the sub- 
committee of the Joint Committee from the America;! Council on Education 
and the National Committee on Standards of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
The report of the sub-committee was adopted as the basis of the report 
formulated by the Committee from the North Carolina College Conference. 

The Committee's report was presented to the entire Conference at its 
meeting in the Yarborough Hotel on August 25, 1922. After a spirited 
debate, each principle was adopted serially by a unanimous vote. 

The Conference designated the State Department of Education as the 
agency through which these principles should be applied. 

PRINCIPLES FOR ACCREDITING JUNIOR COLLEGES 

[Approved and Adopted by the N. C. Collese Conference — August 25, 1022.1 

The principles for Accrediting Junior Colleges are as follows: 
In defining standards for the Junior College the committee had in 
mind an institution covering the first two years of college work. At the 
same time it is not unmindful of the fact that rarely is the Junior College 
confined tp this form of organization; usually these two years of college 
work are united with two or more of high school work, or with preparatory 
classes, or with other collateral courses for teachers. Nor does it desire 
to ignore the possibility that Junior Colleges may offer also courses and 
curricula of college grade not now typically paralleled in the first two 
years of work in standard colleges and universities. For the present, 
however, the committee has not attempted to define more nearly these 
varying types, but has suggested as standards certain requirements per- 
taining largely, if not exclusively, to these two college years, believing 
these years to be the essential part of the work. The existence of these 
two years alone justifies the term "Junior College" and all attempts 
at standardization should proceed on the assumed identity of this work in 
scope and thoroughness with similar work done by the standard four-year 
college. 

1. The requirements for admission shall be the satisfactory completion of 
a four-year course in a secondary school approved by a recognized accrediting 
agency or the equivalent of such a course, as shown by examination. 
The major portion of the secondary school course accepted for admission 
should be definitely correlated with the curriculum to which the student is 
admitted. 

2. Requirements for graduation must be based on the satisfactory com- 
pletion of thirty year hours, or sixty-semester hours of work correspond- 
ing in grade to that given in the freshmen and sophomore years of stand- 
ard colleges or universities. In addition to the above quantitative require- 
ments each institution should adopt other qualitative standards suited to its 
individual conditions. 

3. Members of the teaching staff in regular charge of classes must have 
at least a baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent of this degree in special 



In North Carolina 15 

training and should have not less than one year of graduate work in a 
recognized graduate school; in all cases efficiency in teaching as well as 
the amount of graduate work should be taken into account. 

4. The teaching schedule of instructors teaching Junior College classes 
shall be limited to twenty-two hours per week; for instructors devoting 
their whole time to Junior College classes eighteen hours should be the 
maximum. 

5. The curriculum should provide for breadth of study and should have 
justifiable relation to the resources of the institution, but there should be 
a minimum of five departments, each in charge of a teacher giving at 
least half of his time to collegiate instruction in his department. This 
number of departments, and the size of the faculty should be increased 
with the development of varied curricula and the growth of the student 
body. 

6. The limit of the number of students in a recitation or laboratory 
class in a junior college should be thirty. 

7. The college work should be the essential part of the curriculum. No 
junior college should be accredited until its registration in the collegt 
work has reached approximately fifty students. 

8. The material equipment and upkeep of a junior college, its building, 
land, laboratories, apparatus and libraries should be judged by their effi- 
ciency in relation to the educational program. 

(o) The laboratory equipment shall be adequate for all the experi- 
ments called for by the courses offered in the science (about $2,000 
worth of apparatus for each science offered), and these facilities shall 
be kept up by means of an annual appropriation in keeping with th? 
curriculum. 

(b) A junior college should have a live, well distributed, profession- 
ally administered library of at least 2,000 volumes, exclusive of public 
documents, bearing specifically on the subjects taught and with a 
definite annual appropriation for the purchase of new books. 

9. The minimum annual operating income for the two years of junior 
college work should be $10,000, of which not less than $5,000 should be 
derived from stable sources, other than students, preferably permanent en- 
dowments. Increase in faculty, student body and scope of instruction should 
be accompanied by increase of income from such stable sources. The 
financial status of each junior college should be judged in relation to its 
educational program. 

Note: Until 1924, an income of $3,000 from stable sources will be accepted. 

10. The high school department run in connection with the junior 
college shall be accredited by a recognized accrediting agency for secondary 
schools. 

THE SPIRIT OF CO-OPERATION 

This whole program has been attended throughout by the finest spirit 
of cooperation among all the colleges, and between all the colleges and 



16 Institutions of Higher Learning 

the State Department of Education. There was the manifest intention 
by all concerned to use the utmost diligence to bring order out of con- 
fusion, — to work in harmony for the advancement of the cause of higher 
education in North Carolina. The High School Journal, reporting the 
Greensboro meeting, made the following comments: 

"Many important issues were up for discussion, and steps were taken to 
put higher education in North Carolina on a higher plane, to systematize 
it and standardize it in ways impossible hitherto. There can be no doubt 
that lasting good was accomplished." 

The State Department, starting on its task of applying the adopted 
principles to the institutions in North Carolina, publishes herein a few of 
the salient facts bearing on this problem, that have so far been collected. 
For the purpose of issuing teachers' certificates to the graduates in the 
class of 1922, it has tentatively classified the institutions. As it proceeds 
with the collection of material facts, it hopes to present from time to time 
a clearer statement of the condition of higher education in the State. 

The institutions have been classified as follows so far as the graduates 
of the class of 1922 are concerned. 

CLASSIFICATION OF INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING 
IX >ORTH CAROLINA 

I. Institutions for White People. 

GROUP A— FOUR- YEAR STANDARD COLLEGES: 
Davidson College. 
Elon College (since 1915). 
Greensboro College for Women (since 1915). 
Guilford College (since 1915). 
Lenoir College (since 1915). 
Meredith College. 
North Carolina College for Women. 
Salem College (since 1915). 
Trinity College. 

University of North Carolina. 
Wake Forest College. 

GROUP B— FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES IN CLASS B: 
Flora Macdonald College. 
Queens College. 
St. Genevieve of the Pines. 

GROUP C— CERTIFICATES IN CLASS C IN 1922: 

Atlantic Christian College (rated A for 1923 on condition). 

Belmont Abbey College. 

Catawba College (in class B for 1923 graduates). 

Carolina College (conditional). 

Chowan College (in class B for graduates of 1923). 

Davenport College (probably in class B for 1923). 

Louisburg College. 



In North Carolina 17 

GROUP — Continued: 

Mitchell College (to be reconsidered for 1923 graduates). 

Oxford College (two-year course accepted for 1923). 

Peaee Institute. 

St. Mary's School. 

Weaver College (conditional). 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTIONS: 

N. C. State College of Agriculture and Engineering (four-yeir 
course). (Recommended for A rating in 1923). 

TEACHERS' COLLEGES: 

East Carolina Teachers College (four-year course). 

STANDARD NORMAL SCHOOLS: 

^Asheville Normal School (since 1922). 
East Carolina Teachers College (two-year course). 

II. Institutions for Colored People. 

GROUP B— FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTIONS IN CLASS B: 
Biddle University. 
Shaw University. 

GROUP C— CERTIFICATES IN CLASS C IN 1922: 
Agricultural and Technical College. 
Livingston College. 

GROUP D— CERTIFICATES IN ELEMENTARY CLASS A IN 1922: 
Bennett College (reconsidered for higher rating 1923). 
National Training School (reconsidered for higher rating in 1923). 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Perhaps college entrance requirements have been discussed more than 
any other phase of college administration. They represent the junction 
point of college and secondary education. Colleges have desired the high 
schools fo adapt their curricula to the college curricula. The high schools 
on the other hand have demanded the right to prepare their own plans 
of work. The high school in many instances must be a completion 
school, and must therefore be constructed with that fact in view. The 
high schools for many years have had the better of the argument because 
the high schools were not turning out enough well prepared students to 
keep the colleges busy. Conditional students were accepted in great num- 
bers. Within recent years the tables have been turned. More high 
school graduates want to go to college than can be accommodated. This has 
enabled the North Carolina College Conference to strengthen its entrance 
requirements. Graduation from a four-year high school is now required 
and no conditions as to the amount of work are allowed. This Association 
was emboldened to say also that the major portion of the secondary 



18 Ins rn i tioxs of Higher Learning 

course accepted for admission should be definitely correlated with the 
curriculum to which the student is admitted. If this is lived up to, it will 
make the secondary course and the college course an eight-year program 
of consecutive effort. 

Table I sets forth the entrance requirements for the first course listed 
in the catalogue. Other courses have other specifications, but only the 
first course is considered here as of the year 1920-21. This table shows the 
total requirements as to amount, the number of conditions allowed, the 
subject prescriptions and the free electives. Considering the total re- 
quirements for unconditional entrance: 

5 institutions required 14 units. 
1 institution required 14.5 units. 
21 institutions required 15 units. 

The number of conditions allowed varied also as follows: 
3 institutions allowed 3 conditions. 

1 institution allowed 2.5 conditions. 
18 institutions allowed 2 conditions. 

2 institutions allowed 1 condition. 

3 institutions allowed conditions. 

The amount of prescribed work varies all the way from to 15 units, a* 
follows: 



nstitutions prescribed units, 
nstitution prescribed 8.5 units, 
nstitutions prescribed 9 units. . 
nstitutions prescribed 9.5 units 
nstitutions prescribed 10 units, 
nstitutions prescribed 10.5 units, 
nstitutions prescribed 11 units, 
nstitution prescribed 11.5 units, 
nstitutions prescribed 12 units, 
nstitution prescribed 12.2 units, 
nstitutions prescribed 13 units, 
nstitution prescribed 14.5 units, 
nstitution prescribed 15 units. 



The subject prescriptions are as follows: 

a. English: 

2 institutions required units. 
25 institutions required 3 units. 

b. History: 

8 institutions required units. 
13 institutions required 1 unit 
5 institutions required 2 units 
1 institution required 3 units. 



In North Carolina 19 

c. Mathematics: 

2 institutions required units. 
2 institutions required 2 units. 
9 institutions required 2.5 units. 
14 institutions required 3 units. 

d. Greek. 

27 institutions required units. 

e. Latin: 

4 institutions required units. 
2 institutions required 2 units. 
6 institutions required 3 units. 

1 institution required 3.7 units. 
14 institutions required 4 units. 

Note: In nine institutions the Latin prescription may be met wholly or 
in part by modern language units. 

f. Modern Language: 

17 institutions required units. 

4 institutions required 1 unit. 

4 institutions required 2 units. 

2 institutions required 3 units. 

g. Science: 

19 institutions required units 
8 institutions required 1 unit. 



20 



Institutions of Higher Learning 



c» 




OS 




H 




» Si 




nS = 




hJ ^ 




5j ,2 






i 


» ed 

ii 


8 

a. 


91 


9 


W ce 


2 






P a> 


- 


5 S 


9 


H 3 


VI 


«d 


B 

e 


— - 




u e 


9 


y- •- 


— i 


M o 


J: 


— ■-« 


— 


£ -fl 




— 


5 


" 








w : 




K -g 








•< 




H 













O 


"<0 


»o 










































80AU0013 O.JJj 
















33TZdI0g 















-NOOOOoo-.oo-.o©o««o«oc.e<i»« 


o3i!n3in:'j ajapopj 














^< CO ^ M CO C rOCO-^-^OO-T'^COOCO-^**^'**'-^'^ 


utj^-j 















OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


jpajr. 














10 ic 10 10 10 ua 10 *o 






CO 


ON CO <N ."0 <M O CO OH Ci :i ?1 O M W CO ?l M K W CO M <M 


sot}B;uau;BK 












- 


rt O O = ■ O ro oOO<M««0 c, 


A*JO}SIJJ 












CO 


cococococoocococoeocoococococococococococo 


qsr[Saa 














UJ «3 10 ira US 1--. «5 10 


















paquosajj p^c-x 














« 








O N N CC O » iH CO <N nnc^CIIMOOlO W N W N D4 ^H 


suoiiipuoj 














m 










aouBjjug [B+ox 


























: : : 1 




































cr 


1 & 1 ! 






*H 




























3 


1 ~ t 1 






n 














H 




t£ : 






u 


oJ fe 1 1 























: • 






Colic 
c for 















O 


■3' § ^ «j <» j 3 S r" 


- S? : ; 5 «d ; „ s 






«— 


O 


5 -S >. i£ r< f c = - t-l 


-3 = 8 . - g g ',& - ■„ 6 » ; ° 




Asheville Nor 
Atlantic Chris 
Belmont Abbe 
Carolina Colli 
Catawba Coll 
Chowan Colic 

Davenport C< 

Davidson Col 
East Carolina 
Elon College- 
Flora Macdon 
Greensboro C< 
Guilford Coll. 
Lenoir Collegi 
Louisburg < !o 
Meredith Col 
Mitchell Colic 

N. ('. College 
N. C. State C 
Oxford Collcg 
Peace Institut 

Queens Collcg 
Salem College 
St. Genevieve 
St. Mary's Scl 


































(.^ 






(.SJ 


L«J 


CN 





In North Carolina 



21 



* W N ^ 



SOA|}00|g 90JJ 



o c — o 



e3Bn3uBn[ ujjpoj^r 



ni^cq 



^ogj;^ 



sai}c;uai]}t)j^ 



A'JOJSIJLJ 



qs;i3ua 



paqijosajj pjoj^ 



suoi}tpno3 



8DUBajUJJ [BJOJ, 



o co o o 






o o o o 



co <m c? 



li ic 10 10 



tad 


£ 


o 

o 


































o 


o 


■p 




U 


>i 


£ 


fe 


t. 



fH^S 




i- 



c — ■ _ o a — 



o <n o e o o 



C O — N — 



C-j CM ~* 



a) 



M 



.5 U, 

H 



~ CD 

o 



~ CD a St 2 

H | 3 C .2 |j 

< pq p? j 2; w 



22 Institutions of Higher Learning 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

In this report graduation requirements are stated in terms of semester 
hours. All other units such as year-hour, unit, quarter hours, and courses 
have been equated into semester hours. 

Among the leading institutions in America, the amount of work required 
for graduation varies from 107 to 172 semester hours. The most common is 
120 semester hours. "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree," Bulletin 
No. 7, Bureau of Education, 1920, considers 49 state institutions and 54 en- 
dowed institutions. Of these institutions the graduation requirements vary 
as follows: 

6 institutions require less than 120 semester hours. 
54 institutions require 120 semester hours. 
29 institutions require 121-130 semester hours. 
14 institutions require more than 130 semester hours. 

The amount of prescribed work also varies greatly in these institutions. 
The amount of prescription is. shown roughly as follows: 
23 institutions prescribe from 21% to 40%. 
26 institutions prescribe from 41% to 50%. 
33 institutions prescribe from 51% to 60%. 
14 institutions prescribe from 61% to 70%. 
14 institutions prescribe over 71%. 

Among the state institutions, the University of Nevada has the least amount 
of prescription, or 21.6%. The University of Virginia has the most, or 77.5%. 
Among the endowed institutions the University of Pittsburg has the least, 
or 27.02%, and the Catholic University of America the most, or 92.1%. 

Coming now to the list of twenty-seven institutions in North Carolina, 
there are six that offer a two-year course of study, three that offer a three- 
year course of study, and eighteen that offer a four-year course of study. Of 
the six institutions offering a two-year course of study: 

2 institutions require 60 semester hours. 
2 institutions require 64 semester hours. 
1 institution requires 66 semester hours. 
1 institution requires 72 semester hours. 

The requirements in the three-year courses vary as follows: 
1 institution requires 95 semester hours. 
1 institution requires 96 semester hours. 

1 institution requires 102 semester hours. 

The graduation requirements in the eighteen institutions offering a four 
year course are as follows: 

7 institutions require 120 semester hours. 

2 institutions require 122 semester hours. 
2 institutions require 126 semester hours. 
4 institutions require 128 semester hours. 



In North Carolina 23 

1 institution requires 132 semester hours. 
1 institution requires 136 semester hours. 
1 institution requires 174 semester hours. 

The nine institutions offering less than a four-year course prescribe on 
an average 82.0% of the graduation requirements. The eighteen institutions 
offering a four-year course prescribe on an average 58.2% of the graduation 
requirements. Atlantic Christian College prescribes the least, or 34.3% 
Flora Macdonald prescribes the most, or 91.6%. 

4 institutions prescribe from 30% to 39%. 

institutions prescribe from 40% to 49%. 

6 institutions prescribe from 50% to 59%. 

4 institutions prescribe from 60% to 69%. 

4 institutions prescribe over 70%. 

English is prescribed by all the institutions, varying in amount from 3% 
at the University to 30 semester hours at Queens College. Among the 27 
institutions, seven prescribe no History. Twenty do require History. All the 
institutions require some Mathematics. Seven institutions have a major 
and minor requirement. 

Table II shows the total graduation requirements for the first course 
listed in the catalogue of 1920-21. It also shows the total prescribed work 
and its distribution by subjects. 



24 



Institutions of Higher Learning 



g 
B 

<a 

H 
Z 

K 

— * 




S 

a. 



w "S «« 

w « a 

a - 

fc 2 .2 

O * tJ 

M » * 

H .S £ 

3 c 

M 'a' 



1 



JO "!IV 



J °f ,! K 



■"'HO 



°[ r ne 



aScnSucq ujopoj\; 



ut}t;-[ 



^83 JQ 



S0TiBioaq}t;j^ 



Aio^sijj 



qsriSu3 



paquosruj 



l^oj. 



~- -f to c? 



co to to oo o 



O <M -H 












© o co CO C-l 



-i- -r co 









O <N O O 









o co co co o 



CN OO 00 CO 

U3 OO CO CO CO 



CO CO 00 00 '00 EC CO 



oo O) Cl oo CM c: oo co co 



'-N-'MU]CDNfl , ?:Mar. 



u 3 



S Ba Sh 



c tS -i-r'c — 



" 6 a 



o to j;-; 



a J? = — SO 



c o c; o 



fc £ 



a < 



OUn 



o § 



9) -3 o -? = ^ rN ~ 



a; s "5 p 



c= 5;, ^ 5 -= !r>^ 






o ic ^ o >3 cj r ^ 



"E ~ "3 99 3 — j~ i? 



2 o to w x x x 



— " M cc -* 



oo n c: — ci 



cc oa a — in 



In North Carolina 



25 







B*l 








o co o -»< 




C N to H 


9AIJJ3[a 






MN 




~f CO © O 


• lou !IV 






m*5 




"gj CD O O 


lOfBJ^ 






cm o co o 


ioq?o 






CO O O CO 


3 iqia 






CD © Tt< oo 


aoaapg 






_,_ 






aSranSuB^ ujapoj\r 






CM CO o cm 


apra^ 


* * 




O © © O 


spaiQ 






CO CO O CM 


SDt^Biuat{jBj\; 






CO 'S CO O 


iOoisiH 






^ n 






qsi[3n a 






WM 




N CC 00 O 


paqucsajj 










C-] C3 CM CD 


1**0,1 




W 












a 












w 












i-j 






CD 




i-j 




n so 




o 








o 


a> £ ,9 o 




tt O M 
















° >s » 




o|go 




>> 2 (i< t, 








3 1 1 5 






. 


H p £ £ 




S & g g 




s 

» 

JO 

















o 


CO 


o 


o 
















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






















:: 












■^ 






-*» 










© 




o 


o 


EC 


N 














rtn 


H-» 










O 




CO 






O 
















r-l- 










o 


IM 


o 




o 


O 





i~ 


rt 


-* 


fM 


lO 










* 




o 


O 


i 


■* 


o 


o 




ml* 








r4n 


o. 




»o 




CO 


t^ 
















rv- 










o 




X 




CO 


O 
















«in 










CI 


, " H 


t-- 


N 


~* 


o 


<N« 




r _ 


-, 






CD 










N 




























O 


o 


<M 


o 


O 






-f 








! 




















•■ 












o 












A 
























tyj 




o 




►, 


tin 


C 






0) 










'(/> 


! — 


- 






- 














u 

is 
o 


a 




u 


o 
O 


'a 




> 
5 


~ 


-»j 


o 


bf 


c 


c 


c 










a 


a 

o 


- 


> 


03 


D3 


<j 


K 


pq 


^ 


14 


QQ 


- 


« 


CO 


■^ 


« 


to 



26 Ixstiti tioxs of Higher Learxixg 



THE FACULTY 

The degree held by a member of a college faculty is not to be accepted is 
the final test of his ability to give instruction in his subject. In the fol- 
lowing tabulation only the training represented by earned college and 
university degrees is considered. There is no way to tabulate real teach- 
ing ability. The nearest approach to it is to tabulate the training of the 
faculty in terms of college credits. The following table does not con- 
sider the training of the instructors. The effort was to consider only 
those who held rank at least as associate professor. Merely the num- 
ber of instructors is listed, as our information did not show the scholastic 
training of these instructors below professorial rank. 

When we consider the teachers of professorial rank, we find that there 
are 457 of them in the twenty-seven institutions. The scholastic training 
of these is represented as follows: 

The Ph.D. Degree is held by 77 or 16.85% 

The Master's Degree is held by 150 or 32.84% 

The Bachelor's Degree is held by 146 or 31.94'- 

No Scholastic Degree is held by 60 or 13.13% 

A Specialized Degree is held by 24 or 5.24' - 

Total 457 or 100% 

In addition to these 457 there were 229 instructors, making a total teaching 
force of 6S6. In the eleven institutions in Class A there are employed 
391 teachers, or 258 professors and 153 instructors. 

Of the 258 professors the following shows the scholastic preparation : 

The Ph.D. Degree is held by 68 or 26.35% 

The Master's Degree is held by 109 or 42.25% 

The Bachelor's Degree is held by 49 or 1S.99^ C 

No Scholastic Degree is held by 12 or 4.667r 

A Specialized Degree is held by .20 or 7.75 r ; 

Total 258 or 100% 



In North Carolina 



27 



TABLE III.— TRAINING OF THE FACULTY 

(a) Institutions for White People 



COLLEGE 



Asheville Normal 

Atlantic Christian College 

Belmont Abbey College 

Carolina College 

Catawba College 

Chowan College 

Davenport-College 

Davidson College 

East Carolina Teachers College. 

El on College... 

Flora Macdonald College. 

Greensboro College for Women 

Guilford College 

Lenoir College 

Louisburg College 

Meredith College 

Mitchell College " 

North Carolina College for Women. 

O xf ord College 

Peace Institute 

Queens College 

Salem College 

State College of A. and E 

St. Genevieve of the Pines 

St Mary's School 

Trinity College 

University of N. C 

Wake Forest College 

Weaver College __ 



Grand totals. 



150 



(b) Institutions for Colored People 



1. A. and T. College 

2. Bennett College 

3. Biddle University 

4. Livingston College 

5. National Training School 

6. Shaw University 

Grand totals 









10 


1 





11 


15 


(1 


3 


6 


1 





10 


5 








7 








7 





2 


5 


1 





3 


11 


16 


1 


1 


3 








5 


12 


1 


4 


6 


1 





12 


13 


4 


13 


33 


3 


3 


5(5 


61 



28 Institutions of Higher Learning 



STUDENT BODY 

We are trying to show in this table the total college effort in North 
Carolina in 1920-21 by tabulating the college students by classes. This, 
table also shows the institutions that carry a preparatory department and 
the relative effort given to it. There are several universities in the United 
States at any one of which there were more students in 1920-21 than at 
all the institutions in North Carolina. As the high schools increase in effi- 
ciency and turn out greater numbers of better prepared students, it wilL 
be necessary for the colleges to expand, in order to be able to provide 
collegiate opportunity for the increasing army of annual high school 
graduates. 

The college students arrange themselves in classes as follows: 

Freshman Class 2,771 

Sophomore Class 1,563 

Junior Class 979 

Senior Class 720 

Graduate Students 183 

Total Regular Students 6,216 

Special Students, including professional students 
not included in above count 1,562 

Grand Total 7,778 Students. 



In North Carolina 



29 



c o 

32 



HNM'J'iflONoOOlOHNW^iO 



CO OS O «— iNM^mcONOOO 



cocot^-coto»o*oocoQO 



t~-oooooococoor-cocco 

OO-t— < y— I CO CO a N w 



W N H W i- i iO O i— t O O i-H 

i— i eq i— i -^ -^ *-h cm 



ocooocoo.toooo 



00 ,— I i— I CO 



ooioo-^ooi>-cvioo 



OOOOOOOOO^ICOCOO 



0000-^GOC^lC0000005J>-iO 
CM M 00 O CN O CM i-H <M CO 



CO Oi H C«) N N O 



OOO'— < CO — i CO X - < 



C^OOCOOO^^HOOOS 



©OC0©*-t©Ot-e*©O 



00000*00001 



— i r- o ^h 



i— liOOCOQO'— i M ff. (O "5 «5 WJ 



iO (N N O 



Cl iO »o O CO 



lOOat—COMOkOSOGO© 



O O CO O GO o 



ooooo**oo'-or--^ 



■— i h r^-QOO'-^cooO'— i © i- < o 



O0ic0 0t"-»OCO©0©CO 
Ifl H TJ t- 1 CO N OO lO 



0-^tHOO<MOi-<0 



OC-OOOOiOCOOOO^H 
IT3 t-, ^J4 _, I>- CO cm 



O O O M O O 



O O o o o 



o o o o o 



c3 # rf 



fegg^ii 



£ 5 -< o 

3 -S a a 



a r3 _£ 



- o 



xi g a 



s3 

H 
o S 



M 

CD 

o = 
2 3 



; o 



< ** _l 



W O — 



o 



e ^ o O 



§ -S 



a sa .« a js §> .jg °2 s 

O I 6 ^ 1 'I >, O 






- .: 



O 3 

a O 

5 J3 



O M 






03 -C J? 5 =3 

O O Q Q H 



a. u a s 5 



■£ ~* <D ^ 



H^OO JhJSSZOfe 



+* 4S +3 *H £ tS hS 



c o 

135 



rP -tO O N CO Oi O 



■^ »0 CO 



CO OS O *-h 



CO ^ iO CO 



30 



Institutions of Higher Learning 



c o 

;3£ 



HiMM^iOtDNOOOiOHNM^iOCNOOOOHOCO'fWONooa 






lO CN CM N N h 



OONNONfOlO^CO^IN 



000©©CNl>-«©00 



w3Cqi-ieo©U3»-lOOOOOqO 

i— i M ^ ci eo *-i co o oo 



OOOl^OCMCMOOO 



iCdrHeOOOt-HOOOOOO 

h N Tt* Ol ,-h CO O 



GO'OOCOOOiOf--00 



0000*00000 CM o 



tJH CO CO 



iO CM CM 



Ifl *0 tH CM «-H CM O 

co co *o ■** -h rf o 



O CM CO CM 



cO CO O £"*■ CO »0 



lO i— i CO UO CM CI 

W iC CJ io •* o 



CiCMOCMClOCOOCMOO 
CO lO C4 00 tN ■* ^ co 



OOC00005«000 
^ CM -* US 

U3 rH 



OOOOOC0OO»0C0U3<0 



OOOCMOOOO^HOOO 



OOO'— <OO00Oi0C0-^O 



000000000000 



OOOrHOOOOOCOOOO 



O OOCMOOOO^OOO 



000000800t>-eo^HO 

CO CN N tN 



CO CO ^-t CM i-l CM 



— iooo^-^ocnocoocoo 



r-iosoooocB^Nuaooo 

i-. 1-H CM tH CM 



^HOOOi-^OCMOi^-OOO 



^H o O 



-*# o o 



o o o o 



-U "" ui ZZ Cw 






o y o t 



o £ a> -s 



o a 



■St g c-Soo-* 

OOOQQHWfa 



— tl 

o _£ 



M <D . 

i: s, m ^ « ^ Q 3 



<j *. J 



o 



-5 Ji £ 3 S 

OOh 



O M 

"5 ,3 "g « — 

o >, o o 

- a £ I ^ S 

a S ;a .> J § 



-a 2 % o § O ° - $ 

: « s o , m g ^o a 

i £ "5 O 8 1 S « .8 



<- (N CO ■* 



CO !>• OO Ci O 



^WJONOOCiOh 



« t)I lO CO N OO O 
CM CM CM CM CM CM CM 



In North Carolina 



31 



H3 
V 

3 • 

"+- & 

fl ? 

y ft, 

I ^ 

K g 

ft £ 

o r ^ 

H S 

K £ 

P -J 

H s 



— M 

- - 



. 




i-h eg 


CO ■* 


ic tc 






c 


o 














iJZ 












CD 




















o 






02 


E-i 






c 

03 


© o © "* o if: 


a> 


« 






o 


a 














£ 


£ 






hi 




















r~ 






^H ^H 


-* 




§ 








^_ 


in co »o o w c: 


l> 




















o 






02 


H 






W 














K 




© © C GO i-H C" 


CO 


O 






*" 


a 


B 






o 


js 






Ph 














o 




lO CO »Cl © ^H t> 




02 


0) 








_ 


c^ ^ a c^ o n 


00 




















o 








h 






£ 








H 


c 

03 


© © © OS T-C © 


o 


S 




CN 


w 


g 






02 


5 






H 


fes 
















CO i—t 00 -^ lO t> 








Tf ^H l-< ^H e> 


^ 




g 








„ 












CO 










(H 


fn 






rt 








c 








H 


c 

CD 


© © © CTi t^ c£ 


00 


"< 






P3 

< 

Oh 


S 
o 






w 














« 






o 


Ph 


a) 


•* o to oo d c 


C» 
















Is 








o 





















u 














H 






'■ '■ w 






o 




a* 


^ S M 

& g e > 






o 




o ,2 en c3 £ 

rj u n o _ -g 

^ +> p-> *= S3 £ 


















■fl 






c c S3 c .2 £ 

s S S '> "S 3 
•4 pq pq ,j & qd 


H 


a 


6 


H P] « HJ m (C 




~ 


* 













0> 




h w m i< io co 




a o 






3£ 






TJ>— i 


© t^ Cft (M ^h to 


us 








So 




CO 


OH 












_ 




















o 






02 


H 






c 


©©©©©© 


o 


<! 














O 








H 








Ph 


"~~ 






02 


















© © r-i © © © 






a 








cd 
























_ 
























o 






►J 

< 


Eh 






a 

CO 


© © © © <M © 


IC 


h 


c 














H 


£ 










CO 






CO i-H © © CO 


<o 




o 
















S 








^ 




J. 












■+^ 








o 








Eh 

















© © © © © CM 


CM 










P 








Q 


o 






<J 


^ 


















iO 






CD CM 






cu 
















A 








„ 


t— CM © © CO CD 






















O 






02 


H 












Pi 


C 


© © © © © ffl 


■* 


o 


S 








c 






fc 


o 






H 


is 






02 










t— CM © CO CO CM 














03 
















A, 














i i i O ' 






o 






! ! ! A \ 




H 






a 


« I >l S 9 i 

T3 "S CB M g ^ 




Hi 

hI 




o 

O 


O 






. cd .a .k ,5 J3 






< pq pq h! 2: 00 




CD . 






c o 






rf 


z, 







32 Institutions of Higher Learning 



FINANCIAL 

The time has come when it is impossible for an institution of collegia* 
rank to maintain its standing unless it is in possession of considerable in- 
come from sources other than from its students. Student income can not 
supply even half of the necessary funds to run an institution of the 
highest class. It must have a large endowment, or be subsidized by either 
the State or the Church, or some other body able to guarantee a con- 
stant and unvarying income. The total resources of North Carolina in- 
stitutions is in the aggregate large. However, when we examine the re- 
sources of any single institution it is doubtful if any one of them has all 
the money that it could use advantageously. Each institution seems to be 
carrying a program of work that strains its resources to the utmost. 



In North Carolina 



33 



c c 
S!5 



CiC-WMTfiO<0 



X CI O h 



CO -^ *o o 



& 
e 

— 

z •= 

«< s 

z * 
B o 



- s 

■' v. 



c c 



©©©©©©©© 



o o o o 



O O © »-< CO 



GC "-* 



CO o p p 

© O O ■* co t- 00 l^ 

^ X C X C ifl X ^ 



N O O O 0O US 



ooooooooooooo 



OPQiOCOOOihOOOO 



00 *-h -* ro © © O 

t- — ■«**©© ~ 

© © - ?1 c 

f» m N (D N « « — . 



C — — i GO 



5 O © t- ■<* © © © © 

© :z: © — i 3 3©©© 

IO — C LO Cl C N x" d 



© © 



oopOHOooooonio 

© © 3 O C4 O O © © © © ^« t- 

OOOiOGOONOQO^HQ 



ic © oroooiooooooo 

COO«5CONWM»OO^COS 



>, 60 



m -, a o t-i 



ft* 



2 pS e 



o tx o 



©©©■©©©© 



© © CO © © O 

o o »h 9 i-J l> 

CO © CO © -^ ~h 



© rC © © 



© © © © 



00 CO © © 



IQ © ^ 



OOOOO 



©©©©©© 



©©©©©©© 
CD © © 



© *o © © 



— © © © 



© f-H -^ 



o 00 o w P o o w o 



© © CM © 



© © © © 

CO © © © 



© r- © 



-H N O O 

CO t-H CM 



© ^t* 1-H 



© Oi ^h 
© CM CD 



© © © © CM © © 

© © © © © © © 

© © © © CO © © 

c; ©©©©■© © 

3 © © — t^ © © 



Q O © © © © O 
C CC N iO CI P N 
© CM CD CO *C 1— ' 



c fc 

3 o 



?-H CO O O 



—■ — 00 



CC O ~H O 



ZF^ 



o < ^ c g 
2Sc 



e 6 6 o c 



■ a r, - S ^ a » .2 m -s Mi) 



aE 






*8a 



M £ w a 
a -g « ° fe £ .9 -3 



*§.S.°£'3ggj; 

DBHfcOOJJg 



3 2-2 



<g O 



Its 






£ O ft- C -x 



a; ai a; H 5 ? f 



c o 

^z 



iHCMW^iQONXlClC^fl 



00O>OH<Me0^i>AcS 



34 



Institutions of Higher Learning 



*— iiMeoTfioor-co 



OO OS o ^- 



i* Ifl O N M C5 



c8t3 



o cc 

O0 CO 
CO TJ* 



O O O O MD 



O Q O GO ^h 

O O O CC © 



o a 

GO O 
os CO 



010100000-— •"— 1 
N O C: N C *C C CO 

LO N W N ifj ?: m O 



O O h oo o ^ 



OO OO O 

© — -* 






O oo © o 

© Tt< O IO 



ci m © © 



o & 



© © © © co r-- 

© O © ~ CO 

O ©* o bC pH 



CI o o o OO »-H 
CO O O O CO o 

OO tjS o ©" i-H »-i 



© CO -— I O CO "* 



© © >o 



»o OS o c o 

O CO O lO OJ 



C "fl h io L5 

C] t^ C ^ ^H 

CO OS «o CO © 

OO H lO H Tf 

in. r- o © i-n 

rH 03 i-t *C CO 



~^ © © 
OS o o 



oo as o i-i 

en ■"* Tfi 









— CO © © 



O © O OO 



00 o o o o 



os r-- © 



IQ CO lO OS © o 

O lO TO O H 



CO © © ^h 



© © HO CO OO 



C C OO C O U5 C 
© © ^h o CO ** © 



CO so © © 



OO ■* 



— I ^ © -# ~H -^ 

CO CO © OS © io 



tO © CO © *H GO *0 

to © UD © © OS *o 



^h CO 03 



CO CO © OO "O "* CO 






© © © 






— 


© 


© 


© 


to 


— 


5 


© 


c 


= 


© 


J^ 
b 


U3 


© 


© 


o 


Cs 


ZC 


1 


— 


— 


C 
— 


*o 


-r 


*o 


© 


co 


- 


-r 


T- 


CD 


<M 


lO 






T*4 -^C ^H 



OS 



Oh'ST! 



•< o 



M 8 a 



o a a 



E ■« c a ^ 



c-§ O O 



W H 



S 

O — 

O o 

to 

3 "3 

go 

- - 
c3 O 

§ -§ 

=3 I 



_= - 3 o o » 

Pn o O J ^ s 



o 



>« ° 



3 CD I 

T3 O 



to ® 



o — 



u 



o a 



B to 

«{ .2 co "o >, S o 

« A o t o A -3 S'^ioO 
.•£ s o > 



3 — O 3 O tO ? A 
O 3 ,-g S <g 

SgSISg'afc'fco 

~- ^ , Jj „^r^ r- fn 

S k2 "H * ='35^- t i"E'c^2 

SZ0S«O'aiJ!J!a!h&?5 



c o 

3z 



rt 64 CQ tH lO CO 



OO OS © i—i 



THUS «D 



In - North Carolina 



35 



•a JS 

z » 

•- Q. 

a ns 

S 

HI 

k £ 

< - 

fc 9 








1 i— 1 <N CO *«J* *C © 




c 6 






■2^ 






(j 


© O © o O O 


CO 




oc 


OO 


c.2 














OS 


OS 


d S 1 


<* 


•^ 


£3 O 






!?& 




c^ 


ec 




O a 


۩ 




< 










-<*■ 


co 




CO 


a 




© 


O <D CO O OO CD 


b- 




© © © iO »0 CN 


■*# 








3 


© 00 i— i CO Tt* 






— «* 


00 


00 


4*§> 




, _ 


o 


- 


ft - 


o 


o 


«T-g 


o 


o 




c 


o 


-2 *- 


©" 


o 


■2 o 


re 


ro 


OQ S 






ft 


^ 




a 


— — © © O O 


O 








o 






t- :c 




00 








2 £ 
£ 3 




* 


oft 






c 


















M 


" 




^3 












c 


^ ^ —' — — 


OJ 




o5 r^- c: 3 o 




? 




LO 





im © © © -*• 


o 




OO IO H IQ 




a 




-* 


H 


w 






© © © O O O 






O © © o © © 


o 






o 




© O l>- © © © 




u *> 


© © DC © © © 




° 5 

3 — 


© © CC © © © 


5S 


O m N X lO O 




"3ft 


© <M © rH C^ © 




M H ^1 CO H U3 


00 


> 






H 






O 






H 






►J 






►J 






O 






o 


! ! ' ! *o ; 

■ i { i O i 

; ; j ; M ! 

IJilli 

^ o b ° 2 tn 

"3 "g o w g »" J 

c c ^ e .2 fe 

=3 g 2 r 43 § 

< pq cq ^ 2: a; 






"3 




V 






S o 


— m ro ■<* »a © 




jZ 









to 


1 h n n 


*# 


•o 


CO 






a o 














32 














, m 


o "5 -" 


O 


f^ 


_ 








O "5 ~H 






o 







H 3 


O C-) o 


r-, 












o ^> CO 


-: 






■w 










































































H a 


„ 


















^ 


_ 
















































e> c 


o m t~ 












^ 5 


"5 O 00 












O x 








oo" 


















a 


so 












o = 


O K5 O 


rs 





o 


>o 




O OS o 




- 


°. 


02 




ft CO 


O <M Ol 




s 




















O CO Tj* 


_r 




"* 














CO 




tJ< C-3 


^^ 




CM 


s 




1—1 


e^» 














O C5 — ■ 





CO 





CO 
































"3 E 


C OO o 


























IO -- CO 




CD 


■* 


— ' 




E-i 5 


IO OO * 


■* 




OS 


C5 












00 


" 








_ 


ce 


,_, 


CO 





















































































ni 






— 


* - 










«^ 












S 




























a 




























h3 










































O 




c.r 


o 

— 

OQ 

= 

'3 










olleg 
lege 
crsit 


- 


>. 










a 

a 












T. C 
tCol 
Univ 


"5 


■3 


"5 







and 
nnet 
ddle 


a 


- 

C3 


03 


















< PQ PQ 


- 


A 


02 






w 














.9 6 


1H CM CO 


■* 


*n 


CO 




I 


mZ 













36 Institutions of Higher Learning 



EQUIPMENT 

Table VI shows something of the college equipment with which the institu- 
tions are trying to do this work. In this table special attention is given 
to the laboratory and library facilities. The total libraries in all the 
colleges reporting show 358,357 volumes. There is only one library with 
more than 100,000 volumes. There are three others which exceed 25,000. 
All told there are only eight libraries that exceed 10,000 volumes. 

There are only eight scientific laboratories that exceed $10,000 in cost of 
apparatus. 



In North Carolina 



37 







0) 


r- 


iwn^otoNacao^ 






3 ■* it 


i co r-- oo a 


5 O — 




c^ 


t^ U5 CD b 


oo a 








§ d 


l->4 ^ UN ON <.N) CN CN CM CN «- 






3fc 












O O 


OO-iOOOOOUD-^OOOO 


OG©0©CM©©tDCDiO© CO 






>> 


O 


t^O C3 t-( CO O O O 


oo oor-o ^o-^ 








<M 


i^ »0 © OiOOOO o 


© © o *o t— -^ Co a n 


^^ 






o 




T-. -* (M CO *-< CS CN 


00*-< r-l — I CO CO lO (M 








"3 








CD 




















K 
















©g- 










>j 


o o 


OOOOOOCOCiOOOO 


OO ©©00©I>-0»0© r-l 




o 






© O O O © © © OO © O O 


OO oooo -^oco 










CO 


w o n io o © t-- co © r— o 


OOOOOOCD OO-^h 


■* 




o 


p 




(MlOi-HCO CO CM C<l CM CO 


OO '— < CO CO CM CD IO W 


CnT 




3 










O 






o 












'ca 


,cj 












> 


o 


©b 












o o 


oooooooocooooo 


o o o o o o ©■ © cm io o o co 








© 


ioo«o -~ o © o o o o 


OO o © o t^©o 


"* 






■g 




CM © CM O © Ol © © 00 © 
rt rt CD CO N !M h <N 


OO O © O T^^id 
^ ,_, _ ON? 1-1 o t*- *«* 


C5 






>> 














J5 














Ph 


„ 










7! 


C= -H 


OrHHQOONiOOCM(NNT)< 


o h o i* h n a) ft i n m o h 


„ 










O^H ^h ,_, -^ CM CM CO CM 






03 £ 












og 






















. 












°cd 












£"" 


























o ^ 




OOi-l<M^UO©^H©(MOt^i- 


»o 




>i CD 






CM 


CO 




























3 3 












§ ° 
















•O C-l 


'*OTt<OOOCOOO'-'TOiOO^H 


COOOO^^Ot-CDOOOO 


r^ 








OO o 


(Mi-tioepG^ec<Mi— "CnI"- cm 


ooiooraoocoooo^cqusc 








"a 








t^ 












T^ 






o 














H 












o 




t- SB 


^O^OOOCO^Oi— "O >C C h 


cooo©-<*<©or---#<r\i©o 










H^ CO 


n C4 1Q CO Tf C ?1 -i iC CC CM 


OO tO O CO 0O O CO 'f N -rt 






o 






^ -H ^H PQ 




OS 
































s 


3 












o 














Q 










1 






CO CO 


ooo©©o^o©oo©oo 


©©©©©^©©CSCDOO 


1 >o 










00 Or-- CO Tf 


so o o io cc 


o 






oa 






CO "* CO i-H 








>> 





























pq 


















































































































o 
































































5 




























O 

w 

►J 




b 














o 
O 


a 

6 


c 
o» 

o 












o 

0> 








s 


c 






B 












O 




3 CI 

O 01 










t^ 


3 o 










bo 








fl Ph 




O 










D 




P'B 










•g 


O o 








"o 








• JS 




■3 M 










Asheville Normal. 
Atlantic Christian 
Belmont Abbey C 
Carolina College.. 
Catawba College. 
Chowan College... 


Davenport Colleg' 
Davidson College. 
East Carolina Tea 
Elon College 


Flora Macdonald ' 
Greensboro Colleg 
Guilford Colleae.. 


6 

O 

'c 

a 

0) 

l-H 


Louisburg College 
Meredith College. 
Mitchell College.. 


o 

.5 b 

^ a. 
~ 

go 
t a 

£ o 


1 

= 

CO 

Pi 


c. 

b 

"c 
Q 

= 

CO 
2 

5 


§ 
o 

s 

a 


State College of A 
St. Genevieve of t 
St. Mary's School. 
Trinitv College.... 


University of Nor 
Wake Forest Colle 
Weaver College.... 


o 






c; . 
a o 


rtO]n^tooNt»osoH?in^iO(ONooo30Hnn^u50NMO 






^ 


\x 














































cq 




CXI 


CM 


<M 


cq 


CSI 







38 



Institutions of Higher Learning 



^»OtONOOCiOHNW^lOCDN00030H(MCO^iOtDN 



U)OtOC<)H^TilC4>OHO i CD CO O CO i— I CO O CO O O CM CO 



IQ QO N U3 



-* CO "tf< 



io o go o en 



N Tf >c >o U3 CO 



ooooooooooooo 



o o o o 



CD O O 



OOOO'OOOO 



ffl£ 



O o 
CO o 



o o ^ 



O O rH O 



o o o cq t-H o 



(3>000»0-^iOOCViT-H 



^h OO o o 



ooooooooooooo 



oooooooooooo 



OOOOOOOOOOOOO 



OOOOOOOOO 



ooooooooooooo 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 



o 

^ BO 



>> « § a^ 



c 5 o jo ~ 



o< 



£ o 






c^UO 






o a 



O 
a> 5S 2 



o ,2 
-a O 



,5 5 * 

Q Q H 



KfeOOJ 



o 


£3 


'- 




U 


o 







bn 


o 




3 


-H 




O 


_' 


Tl 




pC 










- 


Fh 














J 


gg^ 



rg M ^ O Ml 

DQ p} *" 

m O 

■kD 



o o ^i 



« S 3 "3 ^ jj *» K c * ® 

O Ph C co m m m H P ^ ^ 



a o 

a* 



i— l 03 CO ■>* K3 CD 



^ >C CD 



O *H C-J 



In North Carolina 



39 



s £ 

a ft 

•- o 

*j 4) 

Z 

i * 
h 

H -2 

Z ° 

K W 

Ph "* 

C 99 

P fi 

w .2 

s -o 

p 



o 










--J 


u; 


c: 






fi d 






3£ 










o o o o o co 


o 




>5 


o o 


o 




bt 




"•* 




o 

































pq 










«^ 




>, 


wo © CO O O C 


iO 


o 


^ 


CO o o o c 








CO CM CO © w 


o 


ffl 






GO 


3 


a 














03 


o 






> 


D 


e© 






■* o o o o c 


<«# 






CO o o o c 


Ci 






CD CD O *Q 1C 














>, 


CM 


«* 




J3 








Ph 


&€. 




m 


CO t~- CM O OS W 


CO 




^H H M CN 


00 


C3 " 






O o 






■ o 






°cd 






2; 








CO i-l 00 i-H o ^T 




>* CO 






-»j o 












3 3 






2 o 






feffi 










o n o « ^< ci 


. — I 






CO •■* O C6 W t* 










t~ 





















E-i 






o 




O O O CO CM u- 


o 






W lO ^H ■* "<t 







TO 






























c 









o 



















O CM CO O CM r^ 


_ 






O M IO M M C 


^ 








■* 












O 








B 






W 


















o 


















H 


















J 










o 






i-l 










o 






O 

o 










CO 








bo 

— OJ. 


±3 J£? -5 > 

'mt 1 fl .1= 








p-j 5 h o •« 6 

c _r cy r"i cd - 

"0 "g <D bo S 

5 c "3 .3 - 2 * 

3 "5 > a =3 














"e8 






c 6 


^ n eo ^ in co 




3 


Z 





















CD 








CC 


■^ 


"! 


ee 


1 




fi o 








jZ 












O CM CO CO CO IT 


w 






>> £ 


CO — 


^f 






3 s 










4) Q 










« aj 










£* 








CO CM CM CO WO ** CM 






>> £ 




















'S g- 










Q£ 






>> 




03 


wo CO © CO OO ■** 


=n 


cj 




c 


»-t ~H CO — 


oo 


























cd 






►J 
1 




to 

s 






-2 


O CO O CO CO CZ 


o 








O O <= 










O CO c 








a 


o" t- 


^r 












































CO 










Ph 








O CO O CO o c 


o 






fi S 
o 3 


o o o o o « 








O WO O O 00 *3 


t^ 






co" o" co" w 


wo* 

CM 
















«£ 










>i 


o o o o o c 


CO 






be 










"o 










A 










fe 






o 




£ 






>, 


CO O O CO O CO 


o 







_s 
















c3 




~0 










Lh 






o 










■fl 




«i 






J 






















O O O O wo CO 


wo 






>> 




CM 






be 










o 




















o 










CD 










a 








H 


















a 


















H 


















B 


















J 










rr; 






O 










O 






o 










J3 








60 a 

-2 t 


> 
1 cfl 










nd T. Col 
nett Colle 
lie Univer 
ngston Cc 
ional Trai 














"3 
o 

Eh 






§ rs .E « J 








<i a a 2 2; S 






tt) . 








s ° 


«-H CM CO -CH WO CO 






►3 


fc 














1 



\ 



40 



Institutions of Higher Learning 



LIST OF INSTITUTIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA 
DOING WORK AROVE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

I. Institutions for White People 



No. 



Name of Institution 



Location 



President 



Appalachian Training School 

Asheville Normal 

Atlantic Christian College 

Belmont Abbey College 

Carolina College 

Catawba College.. . 

Chowan College . - 

Concordia College 

Cullowhee Normal and Industrial School- 
Davenport College 

Davidson College t._"_. 

Fast Carolina Teachers College 

Elon College 

Flora Macdonald College 

Greensboro College for Women 

Guilford College 

Lenoi r C ollege 

Louisburg College 

Mars Hill College.... i __... 

Meredith College L~. 

Mitchell College 

Montreat Normal School . 

Mount Amoena Seminary.. 

Mount Pleasant Collegiate Institute 

N. C. State College of A. and E .___. 

N. C. State College for Women ■____. 

Oxford College 1 b— . 

Peace Institute j 1 U 

Queens College 

Rutherford College 

Salem College 

St. Mary's School : 

Trinity College 

University of North Carolina 

Wake Forest *_. 

Weaver College. 



Boone. 

Asheville 

Wilson 

Belmont 

Maxton 

Newton 

Murfreesboro 

Conover 

Cullowhee 

Lenoir 

Davidson 

Greenville 

Elon College 

Red Springs. ._. 

Greensboro. 

Guilford College. .... 

Hickory 

Louisburg 

Mars Hill 

Raleigh 

Statesville 

Montreat 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Pleasant 

Raleigh 

Greensboro. 

Oxford 

Raleigh 

Charlotte 

Rutherford College. 

Winston- Salem 

Raleigh 

Durham 

Chapel Hill 

Wake Forest 

Weaverville. 



B. B. Dougherty 
Dr. John E. Calfee 
H. S. Hilley 

Rev. Leo Haid 

E. L. Greene 

Dr. A. D. Wolhnger 

P. S. Vann 

O. W. Kreinheder 

R. L. Madison 

C. L. Hornaday 
Dr. W. J. Martin 
Dr. R. H. Wright 
Dr. W. A. Harper 
Dr. C. G. Vardell 
Dr.. S. B. Turrentine 
Dr. Raymond Binford 
Dr. J. C. Peery 

A. W. Mohn 

R. L. Moore 

Dr. C. E. Brewer 

W. F. Hollingsworth 

Miss Sallie Austin 

Rev. J. H. C. Fisher 

C. F. McAlister 

Dr. W. C. Riddick 

Dr. J. I. Foust 

Dr. F. P. Hobgood 

Miss Mary O. Graham 

Dr. W. H. Frazer 

M. T. Hinshaw 

Dr. Howard Rondthaler 

Rev. W. W. Way 

Dr. W. P. Few 

Dr. H. W. Chase 

Dr. W. L. Poteat 

A. M. Norton 



Woodrow Wilson College ' Banner Elk Rev. Edgar Tufts 



II. Institutions for Colored People 



1. Agricultural and Technical College.. 

2. Bennett College 

3. Biddle University 

4. Elizabeth City Steite Normal School 

5. Fayetteville State Normal School..- 

6. Kittrell College 

7. Livingston College 

8. National Training School 

9. Shaw University u 

10. Slater State Normal School 



Greensboro.. 
Greensboro.. ... 

Charlotte. 

Elizabeth City. 

Fayetteville 

Kittrell 

Salisbury 

Durham 

Raleigh.. 

Winston-Salem 



Jas. B. Dudley 
Frank Trigg 
H. L. McCrory 
P. W. Moore 
E. E. Smith 
Geo. A. Edwards 
D. C. Suggs 
J. E. Shepard 
Joseph L. Peacock 
S. G. Atkins 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00034036230 

FOR USE ONLY IN 
THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTIO 



Form No. A-368, Rev. 8/95